What Makes a Forest a Temperate Rainforest
(four seasons) and What are the Indicators

Mid-latitudes
Receives more than 80" of rain per year
Mild coastal climate
Nurse logs
Lichen moss
Spotted owls
Old growth trees
Diverse plants and wildlife
A Few of the Poisonous/Toxic Plants Found in the Park
Fox Glove: 1.5 to 6 ft. tall, leafy stems that are erect with rows of pink-purple
bell-shaped flowers, highly poisonous, affecting muscle tissue and circulation
Poison Oak: erect shrubs or tree climbing vines, 3-10 ft. tall, three shiny and
smooth leaflets, oval in shape, toxic to most individuals, reactions vary
Baneberry: few leaves, usually three basal-like leaflets, rounded
clusters of small, white flowers, smooth, glossy red or white berries;
berries, foliage and roots are all highly poisonous
Elderberry: large, lance-shaped leaflets, 5-7 branch, small, white flowers in
pyramidal clusters, unpleasant odor, bright red berry-like drupes that are
edible when cooked, stems, bark, leaves and roots are poisonous
Scotch Broom: shrub, up to 9 ft. tall, numerous bright-yellow flowers,
widespread throughout the area, pods and seeds contain toxic alkaloids
Common Trees of Silver Falls State Park

Douglas Fir: large, up to 210 ft. or taller, spreading, drooping branches, flat
needles, yellowish green, 2-3 cm long with pointed  tips (other firs include
the Pacific Silver and the Grand firs)
Western Hemlock: up to 180 ft. tall, with a narrow, drooping crown, sweeping
branches with feathery foliage, rough, reddish brown bark
Red Adler: deciduous, up to 75 ft. tall, thin, grey, smooth bark, elliptic leaves
with pointed tips, dull green and smooth
Western Red Cedar: up to 180 ft. tall, branches droop then turn upward
(J-shaped), scaly leaves, grey to reddish brown bark, aromatic wood
Vine Maple: shrub or small tree, up to 21 ft. tall, sprawling branches, maple
leaves with 7-9 lobes, small white flowers
Pacific Yew: evergreen shrub to small tree, drooping branches, reddish bark,
soft and papery, bark contains taxol (used in cancer treatment)
Other Fun Facts About Silver Falls State Park
1931: First park land acquisition of 90 acres
1933: Silver Falls State Park was dedicated
1935-1942: The CCC and WPA were present and responsible for
many of the buildings you see today
Home to the Dutch Mignone Apple Tree: a very rare and old species
Latitude: 44 degrees, 52''36" N
Longitude: 122 degrees, 38' 8" W
Receives 85" of rain per year
Elevation ranges from 1000 to 2200 feet
Fir trees comprise 85% of the forest
A piece of the last remaining temperate rainforests in all of North America
A Few of the Berries and Plants Found in the Park

Salmonberry: 3 leaflets, bottom two leaves look to form a butterfly, large
yellow or reddish berry that ripens in May-June
Trailing Blackberry: 3 leaflets, dark green, toothed leaves, white or pink
flowers, small black berries, ripen July or later
Thimbleberry: soft, broad, maple-like leaves, white flower, shallow-domed
red berries
Oregon Grape: the state flower, leathery, shiny, oblong leaflets that are
toothed, long and paired, blue berries when ripe, bright yellow flower
Salal: alternate, evergreen leaves that are leathery, shiny and finely toothed,
white to pink urn-shaped flowers, dark blue to purple berries
Redwood Sorrel: clover-like with three heart-shaped leaves, white flower,
sour taste
(Please do not eat anything on the trail unless you are 100% sure of its ID)
Trails at Silver Falls State Park

TRAIL OF TEN FALLS
This is a designated National Recreation Trail. It includes the Canyon Trail, Rim
Trail, Winter Trail and Maple Ridge Trail for a total of 8.7 miles. These trails offer
spectacular views of 10 beautiful waterfalls:
South Falls - 177ft (can walk behind)
Lower South Falls - 93ft (drops down 185 steps and continues
behind a 93ft curtain of rushing water)
Lower North Falls - 30ft
Double Falls - 178ft (double drop, largest in Park)
Drake Falls - 27ft (named for June Drake)
Middle North Falls - 106ft (short separate trail goes behind it)
Winter Falls - 134ft
Twin Falls - 31ft (splits into 2 cascades)
North Falls - 136ft (trail drops down 65 steps, can walk behind)
Upper North Falls - 65ft

Bike Path
There is a 4-mile paved bike path that begins at the overnight campground

Horse, Hiking & Mountain Biking Trails
There are more than 25 miles of multiple-use trails

Hiking with Your Pet
A pet exercise area is in the South Falls day use area.
Pets are not permitted on the Canyon, Maple Ridge and Winter trails.
Other trails are good with pet on a leash.
Silver  Falls Interpretive Fact Sheet